Making Music Soar

Making Music Soar

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This weekend was Juneteenth, a day that celebrates the end of chattel slavery in the United States and that has just become an officially recognized holiday both federally and in Maine. We mark the occasion with American composer Valerie Coleman’s “Umoja.” Umoja is the Swahili word for “unity.” The composition is performed here by Coleman (on flute) and her woodwinds ensemble, Imani Winds. 

Link: youtu.be/23Yx9gWHh0E

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This weekend was Juneteenth, a day that celebrates the end of chattel slavery in the United States and that has just become an officially recognized holiday both federally and in Maine. We mark the occasion with American composer Valerie Coleman’s “Umoja.” Umoja is the Swahili word for “unity.” The composition is performed here by Coleman (on flute) and her woodwinds ensemble, Imani Winds. 

Link: https://youtu.be/23Yx9gWHh0E

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Wonderful! Thanks for this selection!

June is Pride Month, and we are recognizing it with this performance of the song “True Colors” by the Gay Men’s Chorus of San Francisco. The song was written by Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly, and Cyndi Lauper’s 1986 recording rose to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 charts. The song became an anthem for the gay community during the AIDS epidemic and later during the “It Gets Better” campaign to address gay teen suicide. This virtual performance was recorded in 2020.

Link: youtu.be/ZZLAaCZVV2g

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June is Pride Month, and we are recognizing it with this performance of the song “True Colors” by the Gay Men’s Chorus of San Francisco. The song was written by Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly, and Cyndi Lauper’s 1986 recording rose to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 charts. The song became an anthem for the gay community during the AIDS epidemic and later during the “It Gets Better” campaign to address gay teen suicide. This virtual performance was recorded in 2020.

Link: https://youtu.be/ZZLAaCZVV2g

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Moving performance!

As vaccination rates go up and Covid infection rates come down, we are looking forward to the possibility of live musical performances. This week, we share a performance of “The Impossible Dream” from the Broadway musical Man of La Mancha that marks this transitional moment. The virtual collaboration between Josh Groban and the Young People’s Chorus of New York City is a form that has become familiar to us during the pandemic. But the joy of the kids in being out in the New York City spring singing together reminds us of what we have to look forward to.

Link: youtu.be/mnkD_RpGzWc

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As vaccination rates go up and Covid infection rates come down, we are looking forward to the possibility of live musical performances. This week, we share a performance of “The Impossible Dream” from the Broadway musical Man of La Mancha that marks this transitional moment. The virtual collaboration between Josh Groban and the Young People’s Chorus of New York City is a form that has become familiar to us during the pandemic. But the joy of the kids in being out in the New York City spring singing together reminds us of what we have to look forward to.

Link: https://youtu.be/mnkD_RpGzWc

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Comment on Facebook

Gorgeous performance!!! 💕🎶😍

This week, in observation of Memorial Day, we are sharing a performance of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, accompanied by the West Point Band and recorded live in concert at West Point. 

Memorial Day, originally called “Decoration Day,” can be traced back to spring gatherings in the years after the Civil War to decorate the graves of the dead from that war. The “Battle Hymn of the Republic” is also linked to the Civil War, with lyrics written and published during the war by the abolitionist and suffragist Julia Ward Howe. This version was arranged by Peter J. Wilhousky.

Link: youtu.be/yAqNe-m0a8s

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This week, in observation of Memorial Day, we are sharing a performance of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, accompanied by the West Point Band and recorded live in concert at West Point. 

Memorial Day, originally called “Decoration Day,” can be traced back to spring gatherings in the years after the Civil War to decorate the graves of the dead from that war. The “Battle Hymn of the Republic” is also linked to the Civil War, with lyrics written and published during the war by the abolitionist and suffragist Julia Ward Howe. This version was arranged by Peter J. Wilhousky.

Link: https://youtu.be/yAqNe-m0a8s

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This week we return to classical music with a performance by the British vocal ensemble Voces8, singing “This Is My Song,” set to the music of Jean Sibelius’s tone poem “Finlandia.” 

Link: youtu.be/eXooDIWVRZs

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This week we return to classical music with a performance by the British vocal ensemble Voces8, singing “This Is My Song,” set to the music of Jean Sibelius’s tone poem “Finlandia.” 

Link: https://youtu.be/eXooDIWVRZs

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So beautiful!!

This week we continue our theme of music to celebrate spring with “The Garden Song” by Dave Mallet, performed here by Peter, Paul, and Mary. Chorale President Susan Trask, who shared this with us, linked it to her memories of whole-school singalongs at Lake St. Elementary School in Auburn when she was a teacher there. “We had a whole repertoire of songs that we sang and this one was one of my very favorites. Of course, it’s not just about gardening. As we sang it together, with me strumming my guitar, I’d look out on all those beautiful young faces and just imagine the possibilities there. For me the whole song was a metaphor for what we were doing. We were planting seeds, nurturing them, even ‘tempering’ them with ‘prayer and song.’ I love this performance of the song with children singing along. It takes me right back to those magical moments of togetherness and possibility.”

Link: youtu.be/RHhRyjwYnX0

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This week we continue our theme of music to celebrate spring with “The Garden Song” by Dave Mallet, performed here by Peter, Paul, and Mary. Chorale President Susan Trask, who shared this with us, linked it to her memories of whole-school singalongs at Lake St. Elementary School in Auburn when she was a teacher there. “We had a whole repertoire of songs that we sang and this one was one of my very favorites. Of course, it’s not just about gardening. As we sang it together, with me strumming my guitar, I’d look out on all those beautiful young faces and just imagine the possibilities there. For me the whole song was a metaphor for what we were doing. We were planting seeds, nurturing them, even ‘tempering’ them with ‘prayer and song.’ I love this performance of the song with children singing along. It takes me right back to those magical moments of togetherness and possibility.”

Link: https://youtu.be/RHhRyjwYnX0

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Wow and I thought I knew all the Peter, Paul, and Mary songs! Don't know how I missed this one. Great song and loved seeing the kids sing. Thanks for sharing this, Susan.

This week we are celebrating Spring with some of Lucy Simon’s music from The Secret Garden, a musical based on the classic children’s book by Frances Hodgson Burnett. The song featured here, “Wick,” focuses on the reawakening of life in spring and evokes the miracle of both plant and human growth. Come-a-lily, come-a-lilac – it’s spring!

Link: youtu.be/QUsSh6S4Pvg

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This week we are celebrating Spring with some of Lucy Simon’s music from The Secret Garden, a musical based on the classic children’s book by Frances Hodgson Burnett. The song featured here, “Wick,” focuses on the reawakening of life in spring and evokes the miracle of both plant and human growth. Come-a-lily, come-a-lilac – it’s spring!

Link: https://youtu.be/QUsSh6S4Pvg

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This week we are sharing the American folk song “Shenandoah” as arranged by Robert Shaw and performed by the Robert Shaw Chorale. The conductor Robert Shaw lived from 1916 to 1999 and formed the Robert Shaw Chorale in New York City in 1948. Shaw’s great influence in American music included bringing new attention to choral music, mentoring younger conductors, and racially integrating choral singing groups. The Robert Shaw Chorale recorded “Shenandoah” in 1960 as part of a collection of sea shanties.

Link: youtu.be/IBH2QrUyz7o

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This week we are sharing the American folk song “Shenandoah” as arranged by Robert Shaw and performed by the Robert Shaw Chorale. The conductor Robert Shaw lived from 1916 to 1999 and formed the Robert Shaw Chorale in New York City in 1948. Shaw’s great influence in American music included bringing new attention to choral music, mentoring younger conductors, and racially integrating choral singing groups. The Robert Shaw Chorale recorded “Shenandoah” in 1960 as part of a collection of sea shanties.

Link: https://youtu.be/IBH2QrUyz7o

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Comment on Facebook

One of my all time favorites. Thank you

This week, in the spirit of Earth Day, we are sharing the Paul Winter Consort’s song “Common Ground,” a celebration of natural and human harmonies and of the web of life – performed here by Jim Scott.

Link: youtu.be/ZTeRT_5gbJo

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This week, in the spirit of Earth Day, we are sharing the Paul Winter Consort’s song “Common Ground,” a celebration of natural and human harmonies and of the web of life – performed here by Jim Scott.

Link: https://youtu.be/ZTeRT_5gbJo

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The Shaker song “Simple Gifts” was written in the mid-nineteenth century, but it is often associated with the twentieth century American composer Aaron Copeland, who used “Simple Gifts” as a prominent theme in his ballet, “Appalachian Spring.” Copeland surrounded the simple Shaker melody with lush orchestration. While Copeland’s version is beautiful, this performance by Yo-Yo Ma and Alison Krauss seems truer to the spirit of the Shaker original.

Link: youtu.be/baNueuDCue0

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The Shaker song “Simple Gifts” was written in the mid-nineteenth century, but it is often associated with the twentieth century American composer Aaron Copeland, who used “Simple Gifts” as a prominent theme in his ballet, “Appalachian Spring.” Copeland surrounded the simple Shaker melody with lush orchestration. While Copeland’s version is beautiful, this performance by Yo-Yo Ma and Alison Krauss seems truer to the spirit of the Shaker original.

Link: https://youtu.be/baNueuDCue0

#MakingMusicSoarImage attachment

This week, we are delighted to bring you the Young People’s Chorus of New York City, singing Leonard Cohen’s 1984 song “Hallelujah.” A few years after Cohen first recorded this song, Francisco J. Nunez founded the Young People’s Chorus of New York City with the mission to “provide children of all cultural and economic backgrounds with a unique program of music education and choral performance that seeks to fulfill each child’s potential, while creating a model of artistic excellence and diversity that enriches the community.”

Nunez’s success in achieving his vision can be seen and heard in this rehearsal recorded in 2019. Enjoy!

youtu.be/9G8NCnbpSrA

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This week, we are delighted to bring you the Young People’s Chorus of New York City, singing Leonard Cohen’s 1984 song “Hallelujah.” A few years after Cohen first recorded this song, Francisco J. Nunez founded the Young People’s Chorus of New York City with the mission to “provide children of all cultural and economic backgrounds with a unique program of music education and choral performance that seeks to fulfill each child’s potential, while creating a model of artistic excellence and diversity that enriches the community.”

Nunez’s success in achieving his vision can be seen and heard in this rehearsal recorded in 2019. Enjoy!

https://youtu.be/9G8NCnbpSrA

#MakingMusicSoarImage attachment

On this second-to-the-last day of Women’s History Month, we are celebrating women with Libby Larsen’s “We Pray to Be at Peace,” performed here by the Concordia Choir of Olathe East High School in Olathe, Kansas.

Link: youtu.be/toaM2i00FXs

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On this second-to-the-last day of Women’s History Month, we are celebrating women with Libby Larsen’s “We Pray to Be at Peace,” performed here by the Concordia Choir of Olathe East High School in Olathe, Kansas. 

Link: https://youtu.be/toaM2i00FXs

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This week, we are featuring our own Maine Music Society Chamber Singers in a virtual performance of Gordon Bok’s “Hearth and Fire.” Unlike other songs that the Chamber Singers have recorded virtually, they have never actually sung this one together in person, having learned, rehearsed, and recorded it only virtually. 

Jean Bass, who did the legwork to get permission for this performance, explained that, “It took just a little googling for me to locate Gordon Bok's agent. She secured Gordon's permission for us to add Hearth and Fire to our repertoire, and sent us an arrangement. It happened to be in 4/4 time and we (well, I, but folks were willing to indulge me) preferred the 3/4 version on the recording of his that we'd shared.  When I wrote back for permission to sing it in 3/4, she replied, ‘Don't stress, just sing,’ which seemed excellent advice for the time we're in.”

After being spoiled for days by lovely spring weather, it looks as though there is cold rain in the forecast. Don’t stress about the change in weather; just snuggle inside and enjoy “Hearth and Fire.” 

Link: youtu.be/_GlzAIux580

#MakingMusicSoar
... See MoreSee Less

This week, we are featuring our own Maine Music Society Chamber Singers in a virtual performance of Gordon Bok’s “Hearth and Fire.” Unlike other songs that the Chamber Singers have recorded virtually, they have never actually sung this one together in person, having learned, rehearsed, and recorded it only virtually. 

Jean Bass, who did the legwork to get permission for this performance, explained that, “It took just a little googling for me to locate Gordon Boks agent. She secured Gordons permission for us to add Hearth and Fire to our repertoire, and sent us an arrangement. It happened to be in 4/4 time and we (well, I, but folks were willing to indulge me) preferred the 3/4 version on the recording of his that wed shared.  When I wrote back for permission to sing it in 3/4, she replied, ‘Dont stress, just sing,’ which seemed excellent advice for the time were in.”

After being spoiled for days by lovely spring weather, it looks as though there is cold rain in the forecast. Don’t stress about the change in weather; just snuggle inside and enjoy “Hearth and Fire.” 

Link: https://youtu.be/_GlzAIux580

#MakingMusicSoarImage attachment

This week chorale member Jane Mitchell is sharing the British rock band Queen’s hit song, “Somebody to Love,” performed here by the Toronto rock choir, newchoir. Jane chose to share this music “because it's one of the first songs I heard that had the big choral sound that I fell in love with. The power of many voices singing together as one is truly joyful and inspiring. Singing with the Chorale brings back these feelings. I'm hoping some day we can sing this!”

Jane Mitchell sings soprano in both the Maine Music Society Chorale and the Chamber Singers, and she is also a member of the Maine Music Society Board of Directors. Recently retired after 35 years working as a paralegal, Jane lives in Greene with her husband and two cats. Prior to the pandemic, in addition to singing, she was very active in theater with Community Little Theatre and Monmouth Community Players. She looks forward to the day when all these activities can resume.

Link: youtu.be/pl-JzXT5glc

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This week chorale member Jane Mitchell is sharing the British rock band Queen’s hit song, “Somebody to Love,” performed here by the Toronto rock choir, newchoir. Jane chose to share this music “because its one of the first songs I heard that had the big choral sound that I fell in love with. The power of many voices singing together as one is truly joyful and inspiring. Singing with the Chorale brings back these feelings. Im hoping some day we can sing this!”

Jane Mitchell sings soprano in both the Maine Music Society Chorale and the Chamber Singers, and she is also a member of the Maine Music Society Board of Directors. Recently retired after 35 years working as a paralegal, Jane lives in Greene with her husband and two cats. Prior to the pandemic, in addition to singing, she was very active in theater with Community Little Theatre and Monmouth Community Players. She looks forward to the day when all these activities can resume.

Link: https://youtu.be/pl-JzXT5glc

#MakingMusicSoarImage attachment

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Spectacular!! Uplifting!!

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